Fall Research Expo 2021

Criminal Justice, Mass Incarceration, and COVID-19: Understanding Prison Health and Prison Health Activism in the United States

This senior thesis project, tentatively titled "Criminal Justice, Mass Incarceration, and COVID-19: Understanding Prison Health and Prison Health Activism in the United States," studies recent and longer threads of social and historical context from the twentieth century to the present to better understand the disproportionate impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on incarcerated individuals in the United States and construct a deeper overview of prison health in the country. It aims to draw connections between history and the COVID-19 pandemic, revealing the broader attitudes and challenges toward advancing the health and human rights of incarcerated people in the United States and further examining discourse at the intersection of health, criminal justice, and mass incarceration.

Drawing on past outbreaks in America's correctional facilities and instances of unethical experimentation behind bars, this research explores the following question: Why has the COVID-19 pandemic disproportionately impacted incarcerated individuals in the United States? Why is the nation's incarcerated population so medically vulnerable to the novel coronavirus?

An important note is that the work for this project is still ongoing. The material in this presentation reflects the research completed so far.

PRESENTED BY
Mazzatenta Award
College of Arts & Sciences 2022
Advised By
David Barnes
Associate Professor, History and Sociology of Science
Join Nikki for a virtual discussion
PRESENTED BY
Mazzatenta Award
Andrea Mitchell Center Undergraduate Research Fellowship
College of Arts & Sciences 2022
Advised By
David Barnes
Associate Professor, History and Sociology of Science

Comments

Nikki, this was a very interesting and enlightening project. I feel as though the coverage of this pandemic has definitely glossed over and failed to consider the effects on those who are incarcerated. It was especially concerning to read about how this is nothing new. As this research continues I hope that further considerations can acknowledge possible solutions.